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PSE Elite Pro Staff

In the first leg of the IBO triple crown, Team PSE Elite Pro Shooter Tim Gillingham took 2nd place in the Pro Class following a one arrow shoot off, while Joseph Goza took 3rd for the weekend.

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In the MBO class, Team PSE took 2nd and 3rd place for the weekend, with Jerry Mullet and Derrick Phillips taking two of the three podium spots with their Dominator Max bows.

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Over in the FBO class, Cindy Enwright took 1st place with her Phenom SD, earning a great follow up win after her victory at Pipestem.

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In the SHC class, Bobby Huth took 1st place with his PSE Freak, dominating the weekend.

 

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 The Moose Hunt of a Lifetime with PSE’s Jeff Propst

Meet Jeff Propst: Jeff Propst of northeast Missouri has been shooting a PSE bow since 2008. He was a factory rep for another bow manufacturer for many years. Propst recalls that after he left his previous archery provider, “A very, very close friend of mine, Mark Drury, suggested I try PSE bows. So, I got a PSE X-Force, started shooting it and fell in love with the bow.” Today, Propst shoots the PSE Dream Season DNA and prefers PSE bows, because they’re smooth, quiet, fast and accurate. He says, “With my bow, I’ve taken elk, whitetails, moose and turkeys.”

All my life, I’ve dreamed of going to Alaska; I’ve always wanted to take a moose there. As luck would have it, one of my friends had booked an Alaskan moose hunt and was suddenly unable to go. He called and asked me if I’d like to take his place on the hunt. Of course I jumped at the opportunity. The hunt was booked with Knik Glacier Adventures. My buddy who wasn’t able to go had hunted brown bears with the same outfitter. He had gone on and on, telling me of his amazing experience. Braun Kopsack, my guide, was a legend himself, so I was extremely anxious prior to the hunt.

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The hunt would span 10 days. I arrived on the 20th of September; we started hunting the next morning on the 21st. For 3 days, we hunted in the high mountains with the rain pouring-down, along with cold temperatures. When we saw there was more bad weather coming, we knew we had to relocate. Kopsack contacted the bush-plane pilot to come pick us up, so we could move camp. I knew the weather was getting bad. But I was hesitant to try another spot, since we knew moose were in the area, where we were, and in fact, I could have gotten one our first day. Alaska hunting regulations specify that a legal bull moose is one with antlers that exceed a minimum width of 50 inches. The moose that I started to take on the first day, looking back, probably met those specifications. However, neither me or my guide were completely sure of his antler width, so we decided not to pursue the bull further.

During those first 3 days, I saw five bull moose. We also spotted Dall sheep, mountain goats and even black bears. Although I was hesitant to leave the moose we had seen, I didn’t regret leaving that region, since we were hunting up and down several steep climbs in 3-4 inches of snow. I’ve experienced difficult hunts in rough terrain but nothing compares with being guided by a world-class mountain marathon runner. I’m a 55-year old man, and I consider myself in pretty good shape; however, I definitely was not in the same shape as Kopsack, who tackled the mountains as if they were flat ground.

We left high camp, flew down to the Knik River by airboat, camped on the river, left base camp before daylight and climbed into the high mountains all morning. Then we started hunting about mid-to-late morning. All the moose tended to be up high on the mountains where there was better cover and habitat. Since the land we were hunting was public, there was a lot of boat pressure and moose hunting pressure down low, near the river. So, we were forced-up, much to the joy of my guide. Once we found a series of ditches and draws that provided ideal habitat for the moose, we decided to camp and spend the remaining 6 days there. Finally, on the ninth day, I had an opportunity to take a moose.

We had spent the whole of that day hunting with no luck. In the evening, we started making our way back to camp. After 9 days of mountain climbing, I was mentally and physically worn out. Too, the rain and the snow were taking their toll. But as we took a break on the side of the big drainage ditch, Kopsack said, “There’s a big outcropping of rocks just above us. I’m going to run up there and do some glassin’.” A few minutes later, he emerged, saying, “I spotted a big moose a good ways off. I don’t know if he’s legal or not, but I really think we should go and check him out.” To be honest, I was beat, close to calling it quits, but Kopsack was encouraging and said, “The moose is in a spot we can get to, and he’s in a place where I believe you can get a shot. Let’s go!”

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We went down a mountain, across a glacier stream, and before I knew it, we had moved fairly close to where we thought the moose was feeding. Kopsack made one call, and I could hear the moose coming to us. When the moose got in close, we weren’t sure his rack was more than 50 inches, although Kopsack believed the moose was legal. Even when the bull was 10-yards from us, we couldn’t make a definite measurement. The moose gave us time to check out his antlers; he kept looking and looking for the cow that had been calling to him. He was searching, almost asking, “Why did you call me over here, but I can’t find you?” Kopsack, my son, Chris, and I were all wearing Mossy Oak camo (www.mossyoak.com) that blended right in with the alders and brush. To this day, I am confident that our camo was the reason why the moose couldn’t see us. After a handful of tense moments, the moose turned to walk away. At that moment, Kopsack whispered, “He’s legal, I’m sure of it.”

From that point, the stalk was on, and the bull moose was 50-yards away from where we’d stopped. I didn’t hesitate to take the 50-yard shot for two reasons:

* I had practiced at more than 50 yards, and I knew I could hit the spot where I was aiming.

* I had shot my PSE Dream Season EVO enough to know that when I put my pin on a desired spot, the EVO always delivered the shot.

When I released the arrow, I saw the RAGE Hypodermic Broadhead hit the bull right behind the front shoulder and go all the way in to the fletching of the arrow. As soon as the bull took the arrow, he went over a little rise. We were filming this hunt for Bow Madness so I could, thankfully, replay the shot on the video camera. When I saw for certain I had made a good shot, I turned to Chris and Kopsack, saying, “I’m going to ease up to that rise and try to see the bull.” When I peeked over the rise, I saw that the bull moose hadn’t traveled more than 40 yards after taking my arrow. As a group, we field dressed the moose. Since Kopsack was the only one well-suited to transport meat, he said, “I’ve got my frame pack, and I’ll carry one hindquarter out now. We’ll come back in the morning and get the rest of the moose; we’ve still got a 2-hour hike to get back to camp, and I’d like to get to camp before dark.” So we boned the hindquarter out, and Kopsack carried it on his back.

The next morning, Kopsack called-in some additional packers to bring out the rest of the moose. My son, Chris, went with the packers and he carried the head and rack all the way back. Kopsack knew my leg wasn’t doing well, so he asked me to stay in camp to get everything packed up. Then we could leave as soon as the packers returned. My dream to hunt moose in Alaska had come true. Best of all, my son was by my side when I showed off my trophy, a 57” wide bull moose.

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 Public Land Elk Hunting

Do-It-Yourself (DIY) public-land hunting for elk is a challenge, and I love it. I’ve hunted New Mexico’s elk on public lands since 1997. Throughout the years, I’ve taken 16 bull elk in that state with my bow. Of those elk, 13 were taken on public lands.

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In 2010, I was hunting in New Mexico with two friends, John Williams and Nick Pelagreen. We were on a DIY hunt on public lands, hunting in the southwestern portion of New Mexico. We set-up camp at 7,200 feet above sea level. Then we hiked up into the mountains to about 8,000 feet above sea level, found a big canyon and started hunting up it. We happened upon an elk wallow. We could tell by the substantial foot traffic that local elk were frequenting this wallow. I was really surprised that other hunters hadn’t come across or hunted the area. The secluded wallow was only about 2-miles from our camp. Looking over the pristine elk habitat, I leaned to Nick and told him, “Just watch- we’ll take an elk off this wallow.” Less than 30 seconds after I had made that statement, we heard a bull bugle off to our left and above us. I called to the bull; he answered me with another bugle. We ran about 50-yards up the hill toward the bugling bull and set-up in some bushes.

After we were ready, I called two more times. Both times, the bull answered. Finally, I saw a hearty 6X6 bull headed to the wallow. As long as I live, I never will forget seeing that bull walk through the meadow to the wallow. The bull closed the gap from 100 to 25 yards quickly. When he was close enough, I gave him a cow call. He stopped; I released the arrow from my PSE X-Force. The arrow dug-in deeply, all the way to the fletching. After the bull took the arrow, he went about 75-yards before going down. Luckily, transporting the meat and head wasn’t too difficult, because we were able to pull our truck fairly close to where the bull fell.

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The next year, fueled by memories from the previous season, I had planned to hunt that same wallow. But when I hiked up to the wallow, I was shocked to find that another bowhunter already had set-up to hunt. That’s the risk you run when you hunt public land. But, I still enjoy the challenge of not only finding and taking bull elk on public lands but also trying to pinpoint a place to hunt that won’t be disturbed by other hunters.

Double-Down Bucks

November 3, 2012 is a date I’ll never forget, because it marks the date my son, Chris, and I took two nice, mature whitetail bucks within 15 minutes of each other; interestingly, both bucks were taken with my Dream Season EVO PSE bow. We were hunting our farm in northeast Missouri, sitting in our tree stands, while Chris filmed me. We hadn’t seen much deer activity that morning when Chris whispered, “Dad, when do you think these deer will start moving?” Quietly, I answered, “They should be moving starting anytime, because the rut should be starting.”

Five minutes later, I looked down a hardwood ridge and saw a buck coming toward us. I immediately recognized the big 9 point, because he had appeared on our trail camera with a pair of distinct features: two separate white throat patches under his lower jaw. Given that he was already a trail-camera star, I knew he was a shooter. When he meandered into bow range, I grunted to him with my natural voice, but the buck didn’t stop. I grunted again a second time; the buck spooked and took off down a hill, some 35-yards away. I shoot a slider sight with no fixed pins, which was dead-on at 20 yards. I knew the flight of the arrow would be slightly lower than it would be if I shot the buck at 20 yards. So, I calculated I only needed to shoot 3-inches high of the spot I wanted to hit; the EVO delivered the arrow exactly where I had aimed. Because of the speed of the EVO, shooting 313 feet per second (fps), I made the shot I wanted to make. Before I switched to PSE, my old bow, which shot at 216 fps, would have been too slow and never would have made that shot. I hit that buck in the liver, the arrow traveled forward, up toward the deer’s heart, and then he ran out of sight. I felt good about the shot, however, I wasn’t exactly sure where the arrow had hit him. Even after we had rewound the video, we couldn’t see exactly where the arrow had entered the deer. After we had sat in the tree for a while, I told Chris, “Okay, let’s get down out of the tree, go find my arrow, and look for the deer.”

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Before climbing down from the tree, I let my bow down to the ground with a pull rope. Once I was down, I untied my bow from the pull rope when I noticed movement- another buck was coming our way, and this one had a name – Joust. He was an interesting 11-pointer. When we had discovered him on the trail camera earlier, his most-noticeable feature was a main beam that protruded straight forward, just like a jousting lance. And, so, his nickname was born. Joust was taking his time heading in our direction, eating acorns and hitting brush with his antlers. Chris quietly said, “Dad! Send your bow up!” I retied my bow to the pull-up rope, and Chris pulled the bow to his tree stand. Minutes passed by, and while I was leaning up against the tree where Chris was, I noticed movement out of the corner of my eye. Lowered from the heavens, there appeared a video camera hanging on the pull-up rope. Chris and I exchanged our weapons of choice and waited.

Once I got the camera off the pull rope, I attempted to blend into the tree, which wasn’t easy. We were bowhunting during the Missouri Youth Rifle Season. If you bowhunt during the youth rifle season, you have to wear hunter orange. I felt like a gigantic, neon STOP sign, but I stood still as a statue, filming Joust as he came nearer. I became extremely nervous, because I didn’t know when Chris was going to shoot. Weirdly enough, I’ve always preferred to shoot a quiver on my bow. I know many bowhunters who prefer to shoot sans quiver. However, that day, I was glad I still had my quiver, as well as release, on the bow when Chris pulled-up my PSE bow. Luckily, Chris and I always have shot each other’s bows, because we hunt together so much. I felt certain that one day, we’d have the opportunity to possibly take two bucks out of the same tree. And now, that possibility was fast becoming a reality. We generally like to capture both the hunter and the hunted in the same shot, but since Chris was directly above me in the tree, there was no way I could video both he and the deer at the same time. Communication with Chris was also impossible, so I decided to stay focused on the deer with the camera and wait to see what happened.

Joust hopped across a little ditch and started staring at me. I thought for sure Joust was going to spook. From the viewfinder of the camera, I could see a little, green leaf in front of the deer’s nose as Joust nibbled at the leaf, swished his tail and kept coming straight toward us. Suddenly, through the viewfinder, I saw an arrow coming from the sky. The buck was only about 17-yards from the base of the tree when Chris took the shot. The arrow hit exactly in the pocket to double-lung Joust and made a clean pass-through. The buck only walked 4 yards after taking the arrow.

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Luckily, we had a HuntVe four-wheeler. Since Chris’ deer only had gone 4 yards, we loaded Joust before searching for my arrow. We had no success. We quickly went back to the house and looked at the video of the shot I made on my deer. After forming a game plan, we went out to follow the blood trail. We found my deer 200-yards from where I’d hit him. When we look back on that day, we always remember it was the day of the Double-Down Bucks – when we took two bucks out of the same tree, 15-minutes apart, shooting the same PSE EVO.

To learn more about PSE’s top-quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Jeff Propst Takes a Spring Turkey with His Bow & More

PSE’s Matt Drury Tells How to Become a Professional Hunter

Editor’s Note: Thirty-two-year-old Matt Drury is the son of Terry Drury of Drury Outdoors (https://www.druryoutdoors.com/) fame. For 10 years, Matt has been the man behind the scenes of Drury Outdoors. For 2 previous years, he interned at the family business. When Matt went to college, he didn’t really know what he wanted to grow up to be, although he knew he wanted to use his creative mind and art talent to take raw video and create masterpiece hunting TV shows and CDs. According to Matt, “I was making Edit Decision Lists when I was in high school.” Today, according to brothers and well-known outdoorsmen Mark and Terry Drury, “Matt is the man in charge.” His official title is Drury Outdoors Brand Manager.

Being in the professional outdoor world, we get a lot of questions from hunters here at Drury Outdoors. By far, we’re most often asked, “How can I become a professional hunter like Mark and Terry Drury?” Most people really don’t understand that job opportunities in the outdoor industry aren’t limited to simply being a professional hunter; there are many careers available if you’re driven. Despite popular belief, growing up in the Drury family didn’t automatically guarantee me a job working for Drury Outdoors. I had to prove to my family that I took my education seriously and was willing to work hard to make myself an asset to the family business.

Whether you strive to be a professional hunter or a behind-the-scenes person, more education, especially being educated in matters related to the outdoors, is the key to opening doors in the outdoor community. The more time and effort you’re willing to put into becoming a professional outdoorsman, the better your odds will be for getting your dream outdoor job. For your best chance of working in the outdoor industry, I strongly recommend that young hunters attend college. After I graduated high school, I was gearing up for college but didn’t really know what I wanted to do with my life. Like many college kids, I couldn’t identify where I was going to land, but I really wanted do creative work. I took a lot of different courses in college, including computer animation, graphic design, art and my most favorite, video production. When I learned what was required to take raw footage and make it into a TV show, I decided, “This is for me.” I found out I had a talent for video production and realized I’d use that as a basis for my future career.

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Every year my Uncle Mark and my dad gather 25 teams of hunters and videographers, known as field producers, to help produce footage for the Drury Outdoors TV shows. At this meeting, our producers are given production tips and are taught better ways to shoot video. A major part of that team meeting is an awards presentation. The first award show for our producers was 11-years ago, my senior year of college. As I watched the different teams being awarded for videos they had shot the previous year, I got really excited. After the show was over, I went up to my Uncle Mark and said, “I think this is something I’d like to be a part of,” and the next day, Uncle Mark offered me a job. As with any family business, I was offered a very modest starting salary.

Drury Outdoors’ social-media sites often are bombarded with questions like: “I want to be in the outdoor business, where do I start? I’m going to college, and I want to be a professional hunter. What classes should I take?” Unfortunately, collegiate counselors don’t have course lists for a B.A. degree in Hunting Professionally, but there are courses that will help you in your journey. If you want to get into the video side of the outdoors, find courses that teach video production and the operation and mastery of video equipment, generally found in journalism departments. New cameras with new features are coming out every year; being able to know new technology will make you a benefit to any outdoor operation. Courses in photography also will be appealing to future employers. Do you know what aperture is, and how it works or the importance of shutter speed? What does ASA mean? If you don’t know the answers to these questions, take photography courses on lighting and framing.

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However, always remember that hunting is primarily about shooting. Our field producers, the lifeblood of our hunting trips all over the world, are both hunters and videographers. Some days they are in front of the cameras, and on others, they’re behind the cameras. So, if you’re serious about becoming a part of the outdoor business community, you need to be as good, if not better, with a video camera as you are with a bow and conventional and blackpowder rifles. In college, professors teach students how to be videographers in 4 short years, but learning how to be a true outdoorsman requires more time.

To get John E. Phillips’ Kindle ebooks, “The Most Dangerous Game with a Bow: Secrets of the PSE Pros,” “Bowhunting the Dangerous Bears of Alaska,” and “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” click on each. Or, go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks, type in the name of the books, and download them to your Kindle, and/or download a Kindle app for your iPad, SmartPhone or computer.

 

Growin Up Drury Part 1: PSE’s Matt Drury Tells about His Bow Madness and the Marriage of PSE and Drury Outdoors

 

 Editor’s Note: Thirty-two-year-old Matt Drury is the son of Terry Drury of Drury Outdoors (https://www.druryoutdoors.com/) fame. For 10 years, Matt has been the man behind the scenes of Drury Outdoors. For 2 previous years, he interned at the family business. When Matt went to college, he didn’t really know what he wanted to grow up to be, although he knew he wanted to use his creative mind and art talent to take raw video and create masterpiece hunting TV shows and CDs. According to Matt, “I was making Edit Decision Lists when I was in high school.” Today, according to brothers and well-known outdoorsmen Mark and Terry Drury, “Matt is the man in charge.” His official title is Drury Outdoors Brand Manager.

 

Seven years ago, Drury Outdoors and PSE archery began a working relationship. One year after the beginning of that union, these companies began working on a single-cam line of bows known now as Bow Madness. I shot the PSE Bow Madness for 3-consecutive years. Someone would have to pry that bow out of my hand to get me to shoot anything else. I know many hunters fall in love with particular equipment, and I was in love with that bow. The Bow Madness was such a smooth bow and solved some major problems for me. I didn’t have a lot of time to practice or a good place to shoot, so I needed a well-put-together bow that was extremely forgiving. Fortunately, this bow fit the bill; I could just pick it up, shoot it a few times and be ready to go hunting. For me, the Bow Madness gave me the same ease of use as my favorite rifle. When I had it in my hand, I had the confidence that I’d hit my target every time.

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PSE, Drury Outdoors and I have learned plenty of information through fellow hunters’ trials. After talking to numbers of hunters, we realized many didn’t have enough time or space to practice archery. Like me, they needed rugged bows that could be set-up once. In a perfect world, they’d become proficient with their bows and only have to shoot a couple of practice arrows pre-hunt to stay in shooting shape. I also noticed that the hunters I talked to would love to be able to shoot 100 arrows every day to reach the high degree of skill that my Uncle Mark and my dad have reached. However, the majority of hunters, myself included, work long hours to meet financial obligations. We also have family and social engagements that don’t allow for much archery time. Therefore, by having a bow like Bow Madness, busy hunters can spend less time practicing, while still retaining the confidence and ability to successfully draw on a deer.

 

“Bumps” is the name of the deer that is my crowning Bow Madness achievement. This interesting deer had been photographed many times on my Dad’s Reconyx trail cameras (http://www.reconyx.com/). I hunted him on Halloween. Dad had shot a deer late in the afternoon the previous day with his PSE bow. We decided to wait until the next morning to recover him, which is how I ended up shooting Bumps. Before sunrise, Dad suggested that my cameraman and I go to a stand that had a lot of trail camera buck activity. On the way to the stand, we suddenly remembered we were hunting during the Missouri Youth Deer Rifle Season. As Missouri hunters know, rifle season means we were missing two bright things: an orange hat and a vest. Quickly, we stopped the HuntVe (http://www.huntve.com/). We were far from home and so near the stand that we would have had to take precious time away from hunting to return home. But we had to be legal. My cameraman was about to turn around when I reached into my trusty hunting bag. Sure enough, I had four orange hunting vests. I still don’t know why I had so many orange hunting vests, but I wasn’t questioning it that day, I was just happy they were there. However, one thing was missing – an orange hat. Shooters in Missouri had to wear orange hats, and unfortunately, I didn’t have one. Thinking like MacGyver on the TV show, I wrapped the third vest over my hunting hat, making it probably the dorkiest-looking hat in the woods. But at least for the moment, I was legal. I remember sitting in that tree laughing to myself and asking my cameraman, “How goofy do I look?”

 

About that time, Bumps walked out in front of us at about 20 yards. When the deer had his head down, I drew my PSE Bow Madness, aimed just behind the shoulder and shot. My Rage (http://www.ragebroadheads.com/) two-blade broadhead, pushed by a Carbon Force (http://psearchery.wpengine.com/p/carbon-force-bow-madness-200-shaft-dozen) Bow Madness 200 Shaft, met its mark; I had finally taken Bumps. He scored about 135 Pope and Young points. Bumps was the biggest buck I had taken up until then with a PSE bow. I’ve taken bigger PSE bucks since then, but when I look at the video and see I looked as goofy as I felt with the orange vest on my head, I realize Bumps is one of those hunting stories that will keep me laughing the rest of my life. Bumps and I, goofy hat and all – were up on “Bow Madness,” the TV show with Drury Outdoors that PSE sponsors.

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To get John E. Phillips’ Kindle ebooks, “The Most Dangerous Game with a Bow: Secrets of the PSE Pros,” “Bowhunting the Dangerous Bears of Alaska,” and “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros,” click on each. Or, go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks, type in the name of the books, and download them to your Kindle, and/or download a Kindle app for your iPad, SmartPhone or computer.

Editor’s Note: Bill Epeards of Goshen, Indiana, conducts 45 to 50 seminars per year, all over the country, on turkey hunting, whitetail hunting and dangerous game hunting. He has taken 12 Grand Slams of turkeys and 2 World Slams. Two of the Grand Slams have been completed using his PSE bows.

I took my Eastern gobbler for my Grand Slam in my home state of Ohio. I don’t know how the Eastern gobbler reacts to hunting pressure throughout his home range, but here in Ohio, the gobblers are very sensitive to hunting pressure. If you spot turkeys out in the field 200-yards away and stop your truck to look at them, those turkeys will take off running. I think the Eastern gobbler very well may be the most-difficult turkey to take of all four races of wild turkey, since these gobblers tend to receive the most hunting pressure. Regardless of which race of turkey you hunt, scouting is the most-important part of the hunt. This statement is especially true when you’re trying to take an Eastern gobbler with a bow.

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Many turkey hunters miss the point of being successful. You don’t have to be a world champion turkey caller to take a gobbler with a bow; being a good woodsman it far-more important. Learn the turkey’s daily movement patterns before you start to hunt him. When I scout, I try to get on the highest ridge in the area to listen for turkeys. We know when a gobbler flies-down off his roost, he probably is headed to find food and water. Next, a gobbler usually goes to an open field, a power line, a gas line right-of-way or a clear cut to feed on insects and young tender shoots of grass or to strut, drum and gobble to attract hens.

One of the differences in hunting turkeys from a blind and hunting whitetail deer from a blind is you can set-up a blind for turkeys the same day you hunt, especially if you use a Mossy Oak (http://www.mossyoak.com) blind and brush it in before daylight. When whitetail hunting, I try to have a blind set-up and in place for about a month before I hunt from it to let the whitetails become accustomed to it. Once you set your turkey decoys in front of your blind, if the turkeys respond to the decoys and start to come in, they won’t pay any attention to the blind.

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When you call to a gobbler to get him to come to you, you’re trying to get that tom to perform an unnatural act. Most of the time in nature, when the tom gobbles, the hens will go to him. When you call to a turkey, you’re trying to get him to do something he won’t normally do – go to the hens. Too, a gobbler has an audio global positioning system (GPS). As soon as he hears a hen yelp, a longbeard usually can pinpoint where she is within a few feet. Another reason you need to scout before you hunt is to make sure there are no fences, creeks or blown-down trees between you and the turkey. Although a gobbler can and will go around, under, through or over an obstacle, he doesn’t like doing that. So, you want to give the gobbler a clear and easy path to walk to your blind site. I always start my hen calls with a slate call. As the turkey gets closer, I switch to a diaphragm call like the Quaker Boy Split Notch Mouth Call (www.quakerboy.com), so I have my hands free to hold and draw the bow. If the turkey is a long way off, and I barely can hear him when he gobbles, I start calling to him with a box call instead of a slate, because the box call is louder and has a higher pitch. In this scenario, I’ll move closer to the turkey, set-up my blind, use a slate call and finally my diaphragm call.

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On this particular hunt, I was hunting out of a Double Bull Blind (http://www.primos.com/products/double-bull-blinds) on a picked soybean field edge where gobblers normally come out to strut. We knew the gobbler would show-up here, since we’d scouted the area before the hunt. The first thing I did after we set-up our blind was use a Quaker Boy Owl Hooter to get the turkeys to shock gobble. I wanted to know where the gobbler was, and what direction he’d be coming from when he got to the field. After I blew the owl call, and the turkey gobbled back, I knew the bird was 100- to 150-yards from the field. Once I saw the turkey step out on the edge of the field, I began to purr to him on the diaphragm call. He gobbled twice. When he saw those decoys, he gave them his full attention. I like to use a hen and a jake decoy, or a hen and a gobbler-in-full-strut decoy. Ninety-nine-percent of the time, the turkey will come to the gobbler decoy, because he wants to run that gobbler away from his hens and prove his dominance. So, I put the gobbler decoy closest to my blind at 15- to 18-yards out, with the hen decoy about 20-yards away.

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I like to hunt from a commercially-made ground blind, since having a cameraman in the blind with you is easier. Both of you have more room to work and you can get away with more movement. This gobbler came in at full strut, but he was very cautious. He came in and circled my gobbler decoy about three times. This gave me plenty of time to make sure he was in the right position for me to make a good shot before I released the arrow. I was using my PSE X-Force bow with a Spitfire broadhead (http://www.newarchery.com/products/mechanical/spitfire-2). When I shot the turkey, I aimed just behind the wing butt, and the turkey went down instantly.

Click here to get the ebook “Bowhunting Deer: The Secrets of the PSE Pros” by John E. Phillips, or go to http://www.amazon.com/kindle-ebooks, type in the name of the book, and download it to your Kindle, and/or download a Kindle app for your iPad, SmartPhone or computer.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Tomorrow: PSE’s Bill Epeards Hunts the Rio Grande Gobbler

Vapor Bow Tech

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Standard on Xpedite™ and Beast™

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want pure performance
• Increased Speed, Reduced Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Xpedite™

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want ultimate comfort
• Super High Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Beast™ ECS

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

• Designed for the target shooter
• Comfortable Lower Let-off

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

PSE’s all-new Flex Rod System (FRS) is specially engineered to eliminate torque during your draw cycle, delivering an incredibly stable shooting experience under any weather conditions. The FRS is highly adjustable for precise tuning and clearance, and is designed to work with PSE’s new RollerGlide™ or a traditional cable slide. The flexible rod can also be swapped out with a solid carbon or aluminum rod for additional tuning options.

RollerGlide

RollerGlide

RollerGlide

The PSE RollerGlide™ is the smoothest cable slide on the market, rolling with your cable to eliminate cable friction. It’s compatible with Flexxslide™ 1 and Flexxslide™ 2 bows, or any standard 3/8″ diameter cable guard rod. The RollerGlide™ is a leap forward in cable guard technology.

Evolve Bow Tech

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Standard on Carbon Air® Stealth and Evolve bows

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want pure performance
• Increased Speed, Reduced Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Carbon Air® Stealth EF

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want ultimate comfort
• Super High Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Carbon Air® Stealth EC and SE, Evolve™ 35 and Evolve™ 31

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

• Designed for the target shooter
• Comfortable Lower Let-off

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

PSE’s all-new Flex Rod System (FRS) is specially engineered to eliminate torque during your draw cycle, delivering an incredibly stable shooting experience under any weather conditions. The FRS is highly adjustable for precise tuning and clearance, and is designed to work with PSE’s new RollerGlide™ or a traditional cable slide. The flexible rod can also be swapped out with a solid carbon or aluminum rod for additional tuning options.

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

The PSE RollerGlide™ is the smoothest cable slide on the market, rolling with your cable to eliminate cable friction. It’s compatible with Flexxslide™ 1 and Flexxslide™ 2 bows, or any standard 3/8″ diameter cable guard rod. The RollerGlide™ is a leap forward in cable guard technology.

Target Bow Tech

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Standard on Target Series bows (except Phenom and Supra)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

• Standard Module in Target Series bows with Evolve Cams
• Designed for the target shooter
• Comfortable Lower Let-Off

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off) - (Optional)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)  - (Optional)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off) - (Optional)

• For shooters who want ultimate comfort
• Super High Let-Off

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

PSE’s all-new Flex Rod System (FRS) is specially engineered to eliminate torque during your draw cycle, delivering an incredibly stable shooting experience under any weather conditions. The FRS is highly adjustable for precise tuning and clearance, and is designed to work with PSE’s new RollerGlide™ or a traditional cable slide. The flexible rod can also be swapped out with a solid carbon or aluminum rod for additional tuning options.

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

The PSE RollerGlide™ is the smoothest cable slide on the market, rolling with your cable to eliminate cable friction. It’s compatible with Flexxslide™ 1 and Flexxslide™ 2 bows, or any standard 3/8″ diameter cable guard rod. The RollerGlide™ is a leap forward in cable guard technology.

L.A.S. (Lateral Adjustment System)

L.A.S. (Lateral Adjustment System)

L.A.S. (Lateral Adjustment System)

PSE shook up the target bow market in 2015 with the first ever Lateral Adjustment System (L.A.S.) for compound bows, and for 2018 we are making it even better with our improved Micro-Adjust Lateral Adjustment System!
The micro L.A.S. offers advanced tuning capabilities and makes adjusting center shot and tuning bows more simple than ever before with a single micro-adjust screw.

      1 day ago

      Huge applause for Team PSE's John Cairns for taking archery gold at the NI Championships and Opens in Belfast!

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