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PSE Field Staff

By Dustin Jones
http://www.highcountrybowhunter.com/

Trail Camera
Trail Camera

Setting out trail cameras is a way to keep hunting even when the season comes to a close. To me it is just as exciting setting one out and coming back a couple weeks later to see what it has captured. I’m like a kid on Christmas as I sit and wait in anticipation. I wanted to share with you some tips to help make sure you are getting decent pictures.

The first thing is finding a spot to put the camera. Find a well-used trail, a food plot, water hole, or just a spot that looks like it has lots of activity. There are sometimes that I have set up a trail camera on what I thought to be an awesome spot and came to find out that it was used very seldom. Look for fresh sign with lots of recent activity.

Trail Cam Shot
Trail Cam Shot

Don’t point the camera at 90° angle to the trail unless you are using a mineral lick, scrape, or bait. Majority of hunters setting out their trail camera place it on the nearest tree to the trail and set it perpendicular to the trail. This causes frustration when you go and pick up your camera because more than likely you are going to get blank pictures or partial pictures of animals. When you point the camera at a 45° angle down the trail you increase your odds of getting a shot of the entire animal versus a partial shot.

Remove any obstructions. I know that you want to hide your camera but if there are any obstructions in the way there are several things that can happen. First you will get pictures of nothing because that obstruction may be moving in the wind causing the camera to be set off. Second, whatever is obstructing the camera will be lit up by the flash whether it is an LED or white flash. The best thing to do if you don’t want people to mess with your trail camera is to invest in a security case for the camera. The last thing you want to do is spend money on the camera just to have it stolen a couple weeks later.

Early Season Buck
Early Season Buck

Lastly, pay attention to the sun. When at all possible make sure that when you set up the trail camera not to have it be pointing in the sun. Whether it is in the morning or the evening, try to make sure that the sun rises and sets behind your trail camera. This will help reduce blank images as well as wash out images. When the trail camera is facing the sun and it takes a picture, you will have an extremely white washed out image. The best thing to remember is to have your camera point to the north. The sun’s path will be slightly to the south of the trail camera if you do so and this will greatly reduce washed out images.

One thing that is always promising yet frustrating at the same time is setting up trail cameras. The promising thing is that you are able to see if there is anything moving through that area while you hunt. The frustrating part about it as well is you get to see some of the animals that come by and with my luck I’m either there a day late or a day early. But all in all it is a great way to monitor where you are hunting and it helps you try and pattern the animals. So get out there and have some fun setting up your trail camera.

Dustin Jones is a passionate outdoorsman who loves to hunt, especially bowhunt. He created his blog, HighCountryBowhunter.com, to share his experiences with others. He is a Field Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com and Adventure Team member for MINOX Hunting Optics.
 
Dustin was born and raised in Eastern Idaho where he currently resides with his wife and two sons.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

By Will Jenkins
http://www.thewilltohunt.com/

Will Jenkins
PSE’s Will Jenkins Vendetta

The PSE line up is a big one with a ton of great bows. They are all unique and offer something slightly different but it can be overwhelming. So I took to the internet reading everything I could about the various bows. I like a decent brace height and ATA. I like bows to be forgiving and comfortable. Eventually I was deciding between the EVO 7 and the Vendetta. As a bowhunter I wanted something smooth. I like being able to easily draw my bow smoothly when hunting.

Will Jenkins
PSE’s Will Jenkins Bow

After reading as much as I could I decided the Vendetta was my best shot at a smooth bow with a good brace height and still gets some good speed with my short draw length. With no pro shops close by I’m usually limited by my research and while I’m a huge proponent of shooting what feels good to you, I got lucky on this one. Once my Vendetta came in I frantically called and texted my good friend Tim Johnson so we could get together to set my bow up. Tim is an ace with a bow and by the time he was done with my Vendetta, it was a perfect fit.

I picked the Vendetta for it smooth draw and it definitely delivered. I can’t get enough of shooting this bow it’s simply that good. The smooth draw and solid back wall make it easy to draw undetected and stay at full draw for a long time if needed. For those reasons I have it at around 65 pounds of draw weight. With the Vendetta’s draw cycle it barely feels like I’m drawing any weight at all and I can stay at full draw for a long time with little fatigue. While speed is good these are the most important factors to me as a bowhunter. Speed is great but doesn’t do much good if I can’t get the bow drawn and hold it there when needed.

Will Jenkins
PSE’s Will Jenkins X Force Vendetta

I outfitted my Vendetta with the Aries sight, PSE X 5 Arrow Quiver and an 8″ 9oz Vibracheck Omega Stabilizer. All the pieces come together nicely to make a great shooting bow. I’m extremely impressed with my 2012 Vendetta and can’t wait to see how the 2013 models shoot.

Will Jenkins is creator of TheWilltoHunt.com and Harnesses For Hunters. He’s an avid outdoorsman who enjoys sharing his experiences through his blog. He also writes for Bow Adventures e-Magazine and is a member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association.

Will lives in Central Virginia with his wife and two kids. He hunts in Virginia and Maryland but has dreams of heading west to hunt Elk and Mule Deer.
 

Keep your eye out for the #elktour DVD over on huntography.com! Watch PSE’s Emily Anderson and Dustin Jones hunt elk DIY style on our amazing public lands in the Western United States. Huntography also films a deer hunting DVD called #deertour which you will be able to watch PSE’s Will Jenkins hunt whitetails. Huntography…filming America’s hunters, one at a time!

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

By Jared Bloomgren

Jared Bloomgren
PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Cold Morning Glassing

Like stated in an earlier blog my favorite type of hunting tactic is spot and stalk. This type of hunting pits your wits against that of your prey more than any other style of hunting in my opinion. The name of this tactic is self explanatory really. First you spot your prey and then you stalk them. Fitting name for it isn’t it?! This will be split into two blogs. First part will be spotting with the second part being the stalking portions on my next blog.

Jared Bloomgren
PSE’s Jared Bloomgren Scouting Above Treeline

During the spotting process I like to be on a high vantage point to help me glass as much of the terrain as possible. Often times you may be glassing at distant areas over a mile away or more! This calls for quality optics and the better quality optics you have the better off you will be. Your eyes will not fatigue as fast and you may avoid a headache at the end of the day! I like to use the Vortex Optics Razor HD line. My binoculars are 10x42mm while my spotting scope is 20-60x80mm which allows me to see those very distant areas. I will also be selling Vortex Optics at competitive prices on my website at www.triggeraddiction.com soon as well.

Glassing animals is not always the easiest to do. Animals that are lying out in the clear wide open are generally pretty easy to find but there are times when they remain hidden fairly well. At first look it may seem that there are no animals in the immediate glassing area but usually that isn’t true. Glassing requires patience and persistence because sometimes you may not see animals right away. You will need to look for something that doesn’t belong with its surroundings. Often times I have spotted a buck or bull by catching a glimpse of an antler because of the glare caused by the sun. Looking for lines that do not blend or match; an antler tip sticking out from the brush, a leg from under a tree, the outline of an animal’s back, etc…When I get frustrated or my eyes get tired I take a quick break; stretch, grab a quick snack or drink and then get back at it. It is amazing how much this can help you re-focus.

Jared Bloomgren
Jared’s optics are vital to success

When glassing big country I like to come up with a system of how to do it. The areas I generally look at first are those areas that are obvious bedding areas. Looking for the areas that offer the cover and the shade are very important as these areas hold a higher probability of deer bedding there. During early season the shade is very important. I like to look at ledged, cliffs, bigger rocks, anything that will offer shade throughout the day. I have seen numerous mule deer simply move around a rock throughout the day to keep in the shade. If I am having trouble located animals I like to set up a grid and move through each area of that grid as not to miss anything along the way. This will ensure that you cover all the terrain and will also yield more found animals than if you were just glassing randomly across the terrain that you can see. By doing a grid search I have found that I am much more successful at finding more animals faster!

After finding an animal of your liking you need to decide if it is in a good situation to carry out a stalk. Things to consider are wind direction and thermals, terrain, the animal’s behavior, your capability, and the time of day. Many stalks require a lot of time but just like an earlier blog of mine; they require patience!

My next blog will focus on the bread and butter of the two! The stalking portion to bring the hunt full circle and things to consider when you are stalking.

Jared “J-Rod” Bloomgren is a hardcore Do-It-Yourself bowhunter who strives to better himself each year in the outdoor community. As a professional hunter, freelance writer and photographer, he likes to relive his outdoor adventures through written expression and photography making the reader feel as if they were along on the hunt. He attributes much of his success to the vital education he has learned from the various big game animals that he hunts. He is quoted as saying, “In each and every hunt, success or defeat, I learn something from every outing and that I can put in my arsenal of knowledge to use at a later date, a later date that will again put my wits against that of my prey.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Albert Q
PSE’s Albert Quackenbush

What you see is what you get. That’s exactly how I have lived my life and how I want to be known. My name is Albert Quackenbush and I am a die-hard bow hunter. I have been a bow hunter for 28+ years and I most definitely passionate about it.

Up to this point, I spent most of my life living in Western New York State and utilized everything from a bow to a firearm. I hunted everything, but my passion was for whitetails. I now reside in Southern California where I strictly bow hunt and love to hunt anything I can. One of the things that make it even better is having a great group of hunting buddies out here. In NY I have two of the best hunting partners a guy could ask for; my dad and brother. We always swap stories, talk about gear and plan our next hunting trips. I always look forward to heading back to NY to hunt whitetails with them.

The SoCal Bow hunter blog (SoCalBowhunter.com) started for a few reasons. First and foremost, I love to write. I love telling stories and I getting people involved. I saw little to none of that here in Southern California. I also started it to share information and to get information. When I moved to California, I couldn’t get a hunter to help with anything. Everyone was super tight-lipped. It not only frustrated me, it angered me that my fellow hunters would even give me a tip or two. I wasn’t asking for hunting spots, just where to start. That is primarily the reason I started the blog. The second reason is that I love to test out gear and see what works, what doesn’t, and what I would recommend to my fellow hunters.

I am a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Field Logic and Piranha Custom Bowstrings. I am a member of the RMEF, California Deer Association, NWTF, and is a Life Member for the North American Hunting Club. Best of all, I am now part of the PSE Blogging Staff and a PSE Field Staff member.

Albert Quackenbush pse
PSE’s Albert Quackenbush & Daughter

Most of all I just want to be the best husband and father I can be. Being a hunter, while important to me, is secondary. Sharing what I know with my daughter will be ongoing as she grows up. I feel that sharing what I know will help keep our heritage alive for future generations.

Albert Quackenbush has been bowhunting for more than 28 years. He shares his adventures on his blog, SoCalBowhunter.com, and also writes for Bow Adventures e-magazine. He is a Pro Staff member for DIYbowhunter.com, Piranha Custom Bowstrings and Field Logic. He is a member of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, California Deer Association, and is a Life Member of the North American Hunting Club.

Albert was born and raised in New York State where he learned to hunt everything from squirrels to whitetail deer. He currently resides in Southern California with his wife and daughter and hunts year round.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Eric Grippa – 2012 IBO World Championship Winner MBR Class

My name is Eric Grippa, and I am a PSE Pro-Staffer from a little town just east of Cincinnati OH.  I have been competing in the IBO for the past 16 years, and this year at the World Championships in Seven Spring PA, it all finally came together for me.

The bow I shoot 3-D with is the Omen Pro.  I shoot it for one reason, sheer speed.  The Omen Pro is hands down the fastest bow I have ever shot.  I shoot a 29” draw at 58 lbs of draw weight.  With that set up, my Omen Pro sends my 300 grain arrow down range at 349 fps.  Needless to say, that makes yardage estimation much easier to call.  The class I shoot in is Male Bowhunter Release, which means I shoot fixed pins.  At almost 350 fps, I no longer have to hold a pin high or low on the target.  I judge the target for the top, middle, or bottom pin, hold the pin of my choice on the 11 ring, and let her rip.  That tactic enabled me to take first place this year at the IBO Worlds.  My Omen Pro and I made it to the finals with a comfortable lead.  I maintained my lead through the finals and came off the mountain as a World Champ.

Eric Grippa with his PSE Omen Pro
Eric Grippa with his PSE Omen Pro

I hear a lot of people comment on how they think the Omen Pro has to be very critical or hard to shoot.  In my 2 years of experience with the Omen Pro, I simply don’t find that to be the case.  As long as I maintain good form and follow through, which should be done with any bow, it shoots very well.   And I now have the belt buckle to prove it.

Thanks PSE for making such a fast, great shooting bow.

Eric Grippa
PSE Pro Staff

Mike Hopkins Archery
Mike Hopkins Tournament Archery

Editor’s Note: Thirty seven year old Mike Hopkins of Junction City, Kansas, has been shooting a PSE bow since 2008. Hopkins is a classic example of how to become a better bowhunter. Mike decided to shoot 3D archery just before he took his first buck with a bow. As you’ll see, Mike consistently has been able to take more animals and a wider variety of animals, since he’s incorporated 3D archery into his bowhunting program.

PSE: What bow were you shooting in 2011?
Hopkins: I was shooting a PSE Supra HP. My PSE rep had told me how great the Supra was, and he encouraged me to try one. He let me take his bow home for a few days to practice with, so I’d have a better understanding and a better feel for the bow. He allowed me to set his bow up with my equipment, and I was really impressed with that bow. After shooting the bow, I decided that the Supra was one of the best bows a person could shoot in tournament archery, and in five out of seven national tournaments, I was on the podium to receive an award and a check. I won the Augusta, Georgia, shoot for my division, and I finished second in the Shooter of the Year competition in the Known 45 division. I gave the rep back his bow, but he helped me get one of my own.

PSE: What bow were you hunting with in 2011?
Hopkins: Last hunting season, I decided to try the Dream Season EVO. There had been a redesigning of the risers on this bow, and the improved design of the riser and the improved design of the limb pockets in this new bow made it a step up bow in the Dream Season line.

PSE: Why is it so important to you to shoot the newest PSE bows on the market?
Hopkins: I don’t necessarily have to shoot the latest and the greatest bow that PSE comes out with every year. When I choose a bow for tournament archery or for bowhunting, my first concern is, “Am I comfortable shooting this bow?” Just because a new bow comes on the market doesn’t mean that new bow is suited for every archer in America. That’s why PSE brings out so many new bows each year, and even has a custom shop if you want a custom bow built. Because PSE knows that different people like various types of bow configurations, the company offers a wide variety of bows that can fit almost anyone and will be comfortable for almost anyone to shoot. But since I’m on the PSE Pro Staff, I feel I have a certain responsibility to at least try the new bows that are brought on the market, and if they fit me and my style of shooting, I step up.

As a tournament archer, I’ve got to make sure that if I step up to a newer bow, it actually helps me shoot better than the bow I’ve been using. If it doesn’t, I’ll stay with the bow I feel most consistent with, and the same is true when I choose a hunting bow. I’ve got to make sure if I’m shooting a new hunting bow that it fits me, I feel comfortable shooting it, and that I have confidence shooting it. So, I don’t just shoot the latest and greatest, because it’s the latest and greatest. The new bows have to help me improve in both tournament archery and bowhunting, and if they do that, then I have no problem laying my old bow down and picking up my new bow. I feel that if I don’t have confidence in the new bows that PSE brings to the marketplace, then I can’t tell other bowhunters why they should consider one of PSE’s new bows if they want to step up. I really believe that I need to be shooting the bows that I’m talking about and promoting. I’m not going to shoot a bow or promote a bow that I don’t have confidence in and haven’t tested to know how it performs and why it performs the way it does. That’s the reason I shot my PSE rep’s Supra before I committed to owning one. There was no point in me getting a Supra, until I had tested it and knew it would help me shoot more accurately. The same is true of the Dream Season EVO.

Mike Hopkins Pro Staff
PSE Pro Staff Shooter Mike Hopkins

PSE: Where did you hunt last season?
Hopkins: Last year I moved to Augusta, Georgia, to go to military school. I didn’t move until October, but I went to Florida in September, and my boy and I got to do some hog hunting. We each took a hog in Florida with our PSE bows. My son’s hog weighed right at 100 pounds, and I shot three hogs, two that were 50 60 pounds and one that we didn’t find the last day we were hunting. The fella we were hunting with found it a day or two after our hunt, and he said it weighed 180 185 pounds. I was experimenting with a couple of different broadheads, while we were hunting in Florida. I used the G3, the Grim Reaper and the Spitfire. I felt, for my type of shooting, the Spitfire was best for me. I like the Spitfires because they’re very simple. By that I mean, those broadheads don’t have as many moving parts. They’re expandable, with a good cutting diameter, and when I’ve shot animals with the Spitfires, the blades haven’t broken nor the arrows. The blades deployed on impact, and one of the other broadheads’ blades didn’t deploy. The reason I mention the hog hunt is because I didn’t take a whitetail with my bow last year.

PSE: Mike, let’s recap for a minute. The only reason you started shooting 3D archery was because you’d gone 4 years without taking a buck deer, and you’d missed several. You were a hunter who was using the sport of 3D archery to become a better bowhunter. Now, you’re primarily a 3D archery shooter and go hunting when you can. How did this change take place?
Hopkins: I really like the competitive aspect of 3D archery. I can’t really say that I hunt any more or less than I used to, but I have drastically increased the amount of tournament archery I shoot, mainly because I have more opportunities all year long to shoot tournament archery. Bow season has a very limited time frame. The law stops me from bowhunting all year long, but no one can prevent me from shooting tournament archery all year long. So, I discovered that I had a lot more opportunity to shoot my bow by both bowhunting and shooting 3D archery than I had when I only bowhunted.

PSE: If you have to make a choice of whether to go to a 3D archery tournament or bowhunt, which do you pick?
Hopkins: Fortunately, I haven’t had to make that choice yet. If I had to make that decision, the animal I had the opportunity to hunt, and where I had the opportunity to hunt would be a major factor in which way I would go. To me, part of the excitement of bowhunting is visiting different parts of the country, seeing various types of terrain and hunting under different bowhunting conditions. I’ve hunted in the swamps of Louisiana, the deserts of Texas and the hills of Tennessee and many other areas. The opportunity to go to a new place, a new state and a different type of terrain will make choosing to go to a tournament really tough.

PSE: What types of tournaments are you shooting right now?
Hopkins: I’ve just moved out to Kansas, and I’m primarily shooting state tournaments right now. I haven’t shot any national tournaments since I’ve moved here, and I’m primarily shooting the Known 50 class. I’ll only be here for a year or two, so I may not be able to shoot the national circuit, but I’m not giving up tournament archery. When I move again, if I can get back to the southeast, I’ll be right back into shooting national tournaments.

PSE: What’s a major reason that you advise bowhunters to shoot tournament archery?
Hopkins: A bowhunter who’s been shooting tournament archery knows his limitations and his equipment’s limitations, because of how well he’s been able to shoot in tournaments. There’s no question of, “Can I make the shot, or should I not take the shot?” If you’re honest with yourself, you find out for sure what those limitations are through tournament archery. So, when a deer comes in and presents a shot, you already know whether or not you can make that shot.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Jason Deer Hunting
PSE’S Jason Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

Most bowhunters believe that the more property they have to hunt, the more deer they can harvest, and the greater odds they’ll have for taking trophy bucks. However, PSE Field Staff member Jason Patterson has learned that the number of acres that you have to hunt isn’t nearly as important as the type and the quality of the property you hunt. As hunting leases continue to increase in price, more bowhunters who want to lease private lands are finding smaller properties that they can lease and manage to produce the maximum number of deer. When you have a small hunting lease close to home, you can hunt that lease more effectively, learn the deer’s movement patterns and often take more deer than you can take, if you have large lease further away from your home and work. “I have a place to hunt right outside the city limits of Jackson, Tennessee, where I live,” Patterson explains. “I have had these 50 acres for the last couple of years, and I’ve been trying to manage it by taking as many does as we can. Last year when I got my PSE Evo, I was amazed at how fast it shot. I am an outbound supervisor at Old Dominion Freight Lines. My hunting place is only about 15 minutes from my work, and I don’t have to go into work until 11:00 am. So, one morning before work, I was hunting this small 50 acre plot that had one, 1 acre green field. This 50 acre plot is surrounded by kudzu and sage that’s about head high, creating the perfect place for deer to bed, because there are small wooded lots all around the sage and kudzu. Too, I had planted clover in the green field. I hunt away from the field in the wooded lots when the acorns start dropping. We have a small shooting house on the edge of the field, and that’s where I let Oakley hunt during gun and deer season and shoot does. Last season Oakley took four does with his rifle. Last year I took my first buck with my PSE Evo. I’d taken several does with the Evo already, and there were two does and a buck on the field. My original plan was to take one of the does. Then the buck presented a shot at 42 yards. I’d never taken a deer that far away before with my bow. I’d started practicing in May before deer season arrived in October. I was shooting accurately out to 60 yards and was really surprised at all the new innovations present in the new PSE Evo. When I consistently could put arrows in a pie plate at 60 yards, I felt really confident about my shooting ability inside 60 yards.

Jason Patterson Hunting
Oakley Patterson

So, when the buck presented a broadside shot, I took it and double lunged the deer. The deer only went about 120 yards after taking the arrow. I also felt confident about the shot, because I’d been taking does regularly. We were trying as hard as we could to take as many does as possible off the property, since we realized this little 50 acre plot was a perfect deer magnet. The deer had a place to bed, a green field to feed on during the late fall and winter and numerous acorn trees to feed on during the early season. We realized that the more does we took, the more bucks the land could support. We were attempting to take all the does we legally could harvest.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Bows
Oakley Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

According to Jason Patterson, “I started my son Oakley shooting a bow when he was 10, because with the bow he could shoot a lot more than he could with a deer rifle. He didn’t have to go to a shooting range to shoot his bow, as long as he had a good backstop. I think shooting the bow provides more of a challenge for a youngster than shooting a gun. But don’t get me wrong   Oakley and I gun hunt too. I like teaching Oakley to shoot his bow, because it’s something I can do with him. I can teach him about form and how to aim and also pull arrows for him. I get to be with Oakley, instead of him sitting in front of the TV set or playing a video game. I’ve learned that youngsters think shooting a bow is cool, which is very important. He gets to shoot a lot, especially during the summer months when he goes bowfishing. He’s improving his skills as an archer when he’s shooting at fish. Whether he takes a fish or not, he’s using his mechanical release, drawing the bow, creating muscle memory and learning to hold the bow steady – all elements he’ll need during deer season. I know that shooting the bow is becoming more and more popular in many school systems.  Oakley still loves to shoot a gun, but if you give him a choice between shooting a gun or a bow, Oakley will opt for the bow.”

Bow Hunting PSE
PSE’S Jason Patteron’s Son Oakley

With technology being so much a part of youngster’s everyday world, and with parents often having to work two jobs or perhaps both mom and dad both working to support the family, youngsters don’t have much of an opportunity to get out to hunt and fish as children did 20 or 30 years ago. But according to Jason Patterson, “With bowhunting and shooting the bow, if we have an hour or two after Oakley comes in from school and on Saturday, we can go out in the back yard and shoot the bow. If we both have activities on Saturday, we still can go bowfishing on Saturday night. If I have a chance to go deer hunting, Oakley can go with me. I want to teach Oakley to bowhunt so that some day he can teach my grandchildren or another youngster how. That idea makes me feel good that I’ve done the best that I can to pass my love of archery down to Oakley and possibly to future generations. I’m willing to give up all the animals I’ve ever taken and all the animals I may take in the future for Oakley to have the chance to take those animals.  I feel like I’m making an investment for my grandchildren by taking Oakley bowhunting and bowfishing. Last year Oakley took his first deer during the youth season. He had missed deer before, but this was the first time he had connected. When I saw the joy and the excitement in his face that time was the happiest I’d ever been in my life. Then he took three more does that same season. I have learned that when I take Oakley deer hunting, the hunt is all about him. When he’s ready to leave, I have to be ready to leave.”

When PSE asked Oakley Patterson what he liked about shooting a bow, his answer was simple and direct, “It’s just plain ole fun.” When we asked him about his bow fishing trips, he said, “I never thought I would get to go bowfishing. That was a lot of fun too. When I saw other people taking fish with their bows, I was ready to start shooting. At first I missed a number of fish, but then I started getting better and better. I shot a carp that weighed about 11 pounds. I like spending time with my dad, and I like shooting my bow. I can’t wait to go bowhunting this season.” I think Oakley explained for all of us why we should consider teaching youngsters to shoot their bows when they’re ready and have the “want” to do that.

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

PSE Field Staff
PSE’S Jason Patterson

Editor’s Note: The best thing that we can do as parents is to give our children memories that will last their lifetimes and impart the values and beliefs that we want them to teach to their children. By spending time with our children they learn the importance of family and the need to spend time with their children once they have them. Jason Patterson of Jackson, Tennessee, a member of PSE’s Field Staff, has found that bowhunting with his PSE bow is the thread that connects the generations in his family.

“One morning I went to my little 50 acre hunting lease just before daylight,” Patterson explains. “I didn’t see any deer for awhile, but after daylight I heard a rustling in the leaves behind me and turned to see a big doe coming toward me. She walked right under my stand, and I shot her at 7 yards.” The straight down shot is one of the most difficult shots that a bowhunter has to make, mainly due to most shooters practicing shooting from 10 to 40 yards. Very rarely do people climb into tree stands in their back yards and shoot at targets from zero to 10 yards from the tree stands. Therefore, the deer in super close like this doe was is often the most difficult shot for the bowhunter to make. However, Patterson had learned the hard way how to make this close in shot.

Patterson Deer Hunting
Oakley Patterson

“I learned the hard way to make this shot, because I had missed a deer earlier in the season that was in close,” Patterson says. “So, I talked to a friend of mine who is also a Mossy Oak manager, is really big in archery and also works with PSE. I called him and said, ‘I don’t know what I’m doing wrong. I had a doe at 5 yards from my tree stand, and I shot over her back.’ My friend, Parrish Elliott, told me, ‘Jason, when you have a deer that close, use your 40 yard pin to aim.’ I thought my friend on the other end of the phone line had lost his mind. But he encouraged me to get in my tree stand, set up a target at 5 yards and shoot it with my 40 yard pin. That’s what I did. I realized with the 40 yard pin as an aiming point I could take a deer in close. Although I told my friend about the one doe that I’d missed, I didn’t tell him about the other two earlier that had been in too close for me to shoot. When I started using that 40 yard pin, I found out as unbelievable as it was that I could aim with it successfully at a deer from zero to 10 yards from my tree stand and make a successful shot. I have to admit I had to practice and build up my confidence in aiming with that 40 yard pin, before I believed that this strategy actually would work. On this morning when that doe came in at 7 yards, I aimed like I had been practicing. To my surprise, the arrow hit where it was supposed to hit, and I recovered the doe. Believe it or not I learned that making the 5 yard shot was far more difficult than a 40 yard shot. I’ve talked to many other bowhunters with this same issue. I shot that doe through the top of the shoulder, and the arrow went out through her heart. She only went about 30 yards before she piled up.”

To learn more about PSE’s top quality bows and bowhunting accessories, click here.

Vapor Bow Tech

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Standard on Xpedite™ and Beast™

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want pure performance
• Increased Speed, Reduced Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Xpedite™

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want ultimate comfort
• Super High Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Beast™ ECS

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

• Designed for the target shooter
• Comfortable Lower Let-off

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

PSE’s all-new Flex Rod System (FRS) is specially engineered to eliminate torque during your draw cycle, delivering an incredibly stable shooting experience under any weather conditions. The FRS is highly adjustable for precise tuning and clearance, and is designed to work with PSE’s new RollerGlide™ or a traditional cable slide. The flexible rod can also be swapped out with a solid carbon or aluminum rod for additional tuning options.

RollerGlide

RollerGlide

RollerGlide

The PSE RollerGlide™ is the smoothest cable slide on the market, rolling with your cable to eliminate cable friction. It’s compatible with Flexxslide™ 1 and Flexxslide™ 2 bows, or any standard 3/8″ diameter cable guard rod. The RollerGlide™ is a leap forward in cable guard technology.

Evolve Bow Tech

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Standard on Carbon Air® Stealth and Evolve bows

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

FL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want pure performance
• Increased Speed, Reduced Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Carbon Air® Stealth EF

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)

• For shooters who want ultimate comfort
• Super High Let-Off
• Comes Standard on the Carbon Air® Stealth EC and SE, Evolve™ 35 and Evolve™ 31

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off) - (Optional)

• Designed for the target shooter
• Comfortable Lower Let-off

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

PSE’s all-new Flex Rod System (FRS) is specially engineered to eliminate torque during your draw cycle, delivering an incredibly stable shooting experience under any weather conditions. The FRS is highly adjustable for precise tuning and clearance, and is designed to work with PSE’s new RollerGlide™ or a traditional cable slide. The flexible rod can also be swapped out with a solid carbon or aluminum rod for additional tuning options.

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

The PSE RollerGlide™ is the smoothest cable slide on the market, rolling with your cable to eliminate cable friction. It’s compatible with Flexxslide™ 1 and Flexxslide™ 2 bows, or any standard 3/8″ diameter cable guard rod. The RollerGlide™ is a leap forward in cable guard technology.

Target Bow Tech

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Evolve Cam System (ECS)

Standard on Target Series bows (except Phenom and Supra)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

LL Module (65-75% Let-Off)

• Standard Module in Target Series bows with Evolve Cams
• Designed for the target shooter
• Comfortable Lower Let-Off

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off) - (Optional)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off)  - (Optional)

HL Module (80-90% Let-Off) - (Optional)

• For shooters who want ultimate comfort
• Super High Let-Off

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

FRS Torque Reducing System

PSE’s all-new Flex Rod System (FRS) is specially engineered to eliminate torque during your draw cycle, delivering an incredibly stable shooting experience under any weather conditions. The FRS is highly adjustable for precise tuning and clearance, and is designed to work with PSE’s new RollerGlide™ or a traditional cable slide. The flexible rod can also be swapped out with a solid carbon or aluminum rod for additional tuning options.

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

Vapor RollerGlide

The PSE RollerGlide™ is the smoothest cable slide on the market, rolling with your cable to eliminate cable friction. It’s compatible with Flexxslide™ 1 and Flexxslide™ 2 bows, or any standard 3/8″ diameter cable guard rod. The RollerGlide™ is a leap forward in cable guard technology.

L.A.S. (Lateral Adjustment System)

L.A.S. (Lateral Adjustment System)

L.A.S. (Lateral Adjustment System)

PSE shook up the target bow market in 2015 with the first ever Lateral Adjustment System (L.A.S.) for compound bows, and for 2018 we are making it even better with our improved Micro-Adjust Lateral Adjustment System!
The micro L.A.S. offers advanced tuning capabilities and makes adjusting center shot and tuning bows more simple than ever before with a single micro-adjust screw.

      1 day ago
      Drury Outdoors

      Before you mount a camera to your bow, listen to what PSE's Blake Shelby has to say...

      Do you film your hunts? Many people are mounting cameras to bows - you'll want to know this tip before you do!

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